Use EZRA100 at checkout for $100 off your first Ezra scan.

FAQ

Here are some of the questions we frequently get asked. Don’t see your question here? Please reach out to hello@ezra.com or (888) 402-3972.
About Ezra
What does the Ezra Full Body look for?

Ezra is a service designed to screen for early cancer and early disease, and is for individuals who want to be proactive with their health and get an advantage by looking inside their body. We do this with MRI to quickly and accurately look at your major organs (aside from the breasts, lungs and heart) from the top of your head to the base of your pelvis.

Who shouldn't get an Ezra Full Body?

Ezra was designed for individuals who are feeling well and want to be proactive with their health and gain an advantage by looking inside their body. If you are having a specific symptom, you should see your primary care provider first for a focused evaluation, which may include a physical exam, blood testing and scans.

Why sign up for an Ezra Scan and not go directly to an imaging facility?

Three reasons: cost, quality, and ease. First, Ezra Members pay a lower price. We buy MRI scanning slots in bulk from our imaging partners, who give us preferential rates — and pass those savings on to you.

Second, your scan is analyzed by radiologists who are carefully vetted and routinely review Ezra Scans. 

Third, we make it easy for you. As an Ezra Member, you don’t need a referral, and your personalized report is available to you online on My Ezra; your Ezra Medical Provider will explain all your results, and your Ezra Care Team is always here for you.

How often should I get an Ezra Full Body?

Ezra recommends getting the Ezra Full Body once a year (every 12 months). This potentially allows for monitoring of more aggressive cancers (e.g. ovarian and pancreatic cancers) that may not have been present or too small to be detected in previous scans, as well as to monitor for overall health.

Do normal Ezra Scan results mean that I definitely do not have cancer?

No medical study is 100% perfect, so a normal scan does not guarantee there is no cancer. A very early cancer may need time to grow in size before it can become detectable on a scan. However, Ezra has been shown to be highly effective in screening for abnormalities. For example, our service has found potential early cancers smaller than 1 cm.

Can an Ezra Scan tell me that I could have cancer when I actually don't?

An Ezra Scan provides images to help screen for possible cancerous growths and may give us what we call false alarms (also known as false positives). For example, we may find something that is concerning for cancer, but additional studies with your medical provider show that it’s nothing worrisome. This is good news, but may cause some anxiety while you are waiting for the results from those additional studies.

When I have an Ezra Scan, do I still have to do other cancer screenings such as a mammogram or colonoscopy?

Ezra Scans have been shown to be highly effective in screening for abnormalities. For example, our service has found potential early cancers smaller than 1 cm, that’s about the size of a pea. Still, no medical service is 100% perfect. An Ezra Scan is not meant to replace age-appropriate cancer screening guidelines, such as a colonoscopy and mammogram.

Can the Ezra Full Body see all possible growths that could represent cancer in the body?

Although MRI is great for visualizing potential cancers in the body, it’s not as good at detecting two types of lesions/growths in the body: 

  1. Lesions in the lungs are difficult to detect using images from an MRI since the lungs consist of air tissue. MRI depends on hydrogen atoms (predominantly found in water molecules) being present to create internal images of your body. A CT scan provides a better view inside the lungs. 
  2. MRI is also not as good at detecting flatter lesions, which are most commonly found in the esophagus, stomach, colon and bladder. These flatter lesions are better evaluated by directly looking at them, like what is done during a colonoscopy.
Why are the breasts not included in the Ezra Full Body?

Breasts are not covered by the standard Ezra Full Body because breast imaging with MRI requires the use of specialized breast coils and IV contrast, both of which are not used.

Why is the heart not included in the Ezra Full Body?

Visualizing the heart requires special sequences, slices and time required by a dedicated cardiac MRI, and thus we can generally only comment on heart size.

Can children and adolescents get an Ezra Scan?

Ezra Scans are designed to provide images for individuals 18 years of age and older.

I’m not in New York, San Francisco, or Los Angeles. When will Ezra be available in my city?

We’re working hard to launch our scans in more cities. Be the first to know when we launch in your city by signing up here.

Prepping for my Ezra Scan
Can I eat and drink the day of my scan?

Yes, you can eat and drink the day of your scan. However, it is recommended to eat lighter (e.g. no fried, greasy, heavy foods) and to eat less gassy foods (e.g. soda, seltzer water, beans, broccoli, cabbage, etc.). Also, try to limit fluid intake about 1.5 – 2 hours prior to your scan so you don’t feel the need to stop the scan multiple times to use the restroom.

Can I have caffeinated beverages (e.g. coffee, tea) prior to my scan?

Yes, you may have caffeinated beverages (unless you are having a coronary artery calcium test with your low-dose Chest CT). Just be mindful of when you have it if it usually causes you to need to use the restroom.

When should I arrive at the imaging center?

Please arrive at the imaging center at least 30 minutes prior to your scan time. This will allow you to review and sign your pre-completed paperwork, speak to the radiology technician, change your clothes, and be on the scanning table at the time of your scheduled appointment.

What do I do if I need to cancel or reschedule my scan appointment?

If you need to cancel or change your scan appointment, please do so on My Ezra or notify our team 24 hours in advance (email hello@ezra.com or your Care Advisor).

What should I bring with me to my scan appointment?

Please make sure to bring a government-issued photo ID.

The Ezra Scan Experience
What can I expect on the day of my scan?

Our radiology partner facilities are staffed with dedicated radiology technicians who are specifically trained to perform the Ezra Scan protocols. When you get to the imaging center, let the front desk staff know that you are there for your Ezra Scan and they will take great care of you. They’ll have your pre-completed paperwork and all you need to do is sign. The radiology technician will guide you to the area where you will get your scan done, where you will be given a gown and a locker to put all of your personal belongings. If you are having an MRI, remember to place all metal objects in the locker since the MRI is a giant magnet.

Do I have to change out of my clothes for an Ezra Scan or can I wear my own clothes?

If you prefer to wear your own clothes, you can wear a loose-fitting 100% cotton shirt and cotton sweatpants with no metallic components to them. If there is any question of whether metal exists in your clothing, you will be asked to change into the gown provided. Sports bras are only acceptable if there are no metallic adjustable straps, clips or underwire.

What can I expect when I'm in the MRI machine?

The MRI machine is noisy and sounds like a very loud dial-up modem. You will be given earplugs to help minimize the noise. Some machines allow for the use of headphones. If yours does, the technician will provide those to you and will set up the music you would like to listen to (you can select anything on Spotify). Eye masks are also available at most locations upon request.

Coils are used to help generate high-quality images. Like protective football gear, one is placed loosely around your head and two more on your upper and lower abdomen.

An automated voice will ask you to take a deep breath and hold during portions of the scan to prevent movement that could blur the images. After 15-20 seconds, it will tell you to breathe normally. If you’re unable to hold your breath for the entire time, it is helpful if you exhale and inhale very slowly.

The length of time in the machine and the magnets that are used can cause you to get warm during the scan. Since you are trying to lay as still as possible you may experience muscle twitching – this is quite normal.

Lastly, since we are getting images from the top of your head to the base of your pelvis, this requires you to be in the MRI machine for at least an hour (this is an average time – height, weight and movement play a role in how long a scan lasts). If you would like to have a countdown during your scan, please notify your radiology technician prior to starting your scan (e.g. “Tell me every 15-20 minutes that that amount of time has passed” or “Tell me when I only have 20 minutes left”)

How long is the Ezra Full Body?

Please arrive at the imaging center 30 minutes prior to your scan appointment to allow you to review and sign your pre-completed paperwork, speak to the radiology technician, change your clothes, and be on the MRI table at the time of your scheduled appointment.

The Ezra Full Body (MRI) should take roughly 1 hour. The Ezra Full Body Plus (MRI with a low-dose chest CT) is about 1.5 hours. These times are estimates and sometimes it may take longer due to extraneous factors (e.g. height, weight and movement). We advise planning to be at the facility an extra 30-40 minutes if your schedule is tight.

What happens after my Ezra Scan?

Within 5-7 business days of having your scan, you will connect with your Ezra Medical Provider through Zoom to discuss your results.

That same day, you will receive three data points by email:

  1. Your Ezra Report which translates your findings into straight-forward language and discusses next steps and recommendations
  2. Your original radiology reports
  3. Online access to your scan images.
What health safety measures are being taken at the imaging facility?

Our partner facilities are taking all CDC-recommended preventive actions to mitigate the spread of the coronavirus. This includes screening all staff and individuals entering the facility for COVID-19 related symptoms. Individuals entering the facility are also required to wear a face mask throughout the duration of their visit. Those with COVID-19 symptoms are not allowed into the facility.

What can I expect during the low-dose CT (LDCT) scan of the chest with Coronary Calcium Scoring?

Before the scan begins, the technician attaches sensors, called electrodes, to your chest. These connect to an electrocardiogram (ECG or EKG), which records your heart activity during the exam and coordinates the timing of X-ray pictures between heartbeats, when the heart muscles are relaxed.

During the heart scan, you lie on your back on a movable table, which slides into the tube-like CT scanner. Your head is outside the scanner the whole time. The exam room will likely be cool.

You’ll be asked to lie still and hold your breath for a few seconds while the pictures are taken. The technician operates the scanner from a room next door, but can see and talk to you the entire time. The entire procedure should take about 10 to 15 minutes.

Telehealth
How do I communicate with my Ezra Medical Provider?

After you’re signed up with Ezra, you will connect with your Ezra Medical Provider over Zoom conferencing, which gives you the ability to virtually meet and screen share to discuss your results.

How long after my scan do I get the results?

We’re continuously working on faster report delivery, and currently the majority of our Members receive their Ezra Report within an average of 5 business days.

Why Artificial Intelligence (AI)? Who actually reads my images?

Recent studies show that some AIs could make radiologists more accurate and more productive. Using AIs in radiology is like having a second pair of eyes looking at your scans; however, the final report is always signed off by a radiologist. Think of AI as an added measure of accuracy and assurance.

Ezra’s Plexo Software (which incorporates Ezra’s Prostate AI) is an FDA-cleared software medical device designed to help the radiologist review medical images with the help of AI. No AI is used in current Ezra Scan services, but we are actively working with our partners to implement the technology soon.

Cost and Pricing
Is an Ezra Scan covered by insurance?

At this time, Ezra is offered directly to consumers, and you can use HSA/FSA dollars to pay for your Ezra Scan. We’re working with payers to get Ezra included in health plans. Sign up for our newsletter for updates on our insurance efforts. 

What is the price of an Ezra Scan?

Please visit our Pricing page for information about Ezra Scans. You can use FSA/HSA dollars, and we also provide flexible payment plans. 

What is Ezra's Cancellation Policy?

We know your time is valuable, and ours is too. Out of respect for our staff and our other Members, we ask that you give us at least 24 hours’ notice if you need to reschedule or cancel an appointment. Please visit My Ezra or notify our team by emailing hello@ezra.com or your Care Advisor.

Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI)
What is an MRI scan?

MRI stands for Magnetic Resonance Imaging. An MRI machine is a giant magnet that uses radio waves to take pictures of your body’s organs and structures. It’s safe, as long as you don’t have any metallic implants that are incompatible with MRI scanning (e.g. a pacemaker or certain metallic orthopedic implants). Because of the magnetic field, you may not wear any jewelry or clothing that have metallic components during your MRI.

Are MRI scans safe?

Yes, MRI scans have been around since the 1980s and have a safe track record (and added bonus: pain-free). Unlike other medical imaging procedures such as CT (CAT scan) and X-ray, MRI scans don’t expose you to harmful radiation.

Can you tell me more about your MRI machines?

Absolutely! We carefully ensure every MRI scanner meets our quality standards. Our scans are done using 3T strength magnets in order to make sure we get the optimal look inside your body. 

Is the MRI machine open or closed?

Ezra Scans are not done in open or standing MRIs. In order to make sure we get the optimal look inside your body, scans are done in closed 3T strength magnets. All of our imaging partners use new 3T MRI scanners with a wide 70 cm bore (a wider opening). 

How can I get an MRI if I'm claustrophobic?

Keep in mind that people talk about MRI and claustrophobia based on what they have heard or experienced in the past. Not all of this is true today. Older MRI machines had narrower tunnels than modern MRI equipment. The older machines were often relatively dark, and the scanner’s ceiling was very close to the face and head.

MRI scanners today have wider openings, are fully lit, ventilated, and open at both ends (above your head and below your feet). These machines greatly improve comfort during the exam.

In some cases, you may be able to listen to music to help you relax during the exam. If you wish, you can be given earplugs or a headset to help block out noise from the scanner. Eye masks are also available at most locations upon request.

The well-trained radiology technicians work very closely with you to help lower anxieties, and they will tell you how long to expect your imaging to actually take. Our technologist will see you and be in contact with you at all times during your exam. Speakers inside the scanner will enable the technologist to communicate with you and hear what you say. You also will have a call button (in the form of a squeeze ball) so that you can let the technologist know if you have any problems relaxing during the procedure. 

If you are concerned about how you will tolerate your MRI exam, we suggest talking to your personal medical provider for help in developing a plan or possibly prescribing an oral medication taken to minimize your anxiety. Please notify us if an oral medication will be taken prior to your scan.

Computed Tomography (CT) Scan
What is a CT scan? What is a low-dose CT (LDCT) scan?

CT stands for Computed Tomography. A CT scanner uses the combination of X-ray with computer processing to take pictures of your body’s organs and structures. Unlike MRI, it does require the use of ionizing radiation (X-rays), which is potentially harmful.

A LDCT scan uses much less ionizing radiation than a regular CT. The amount of exposure is generally considered safe and is FDA regulated and approved. The LDCT is the gold standard for screening purposes for the lungs and is the CT imaging technique that Ezra uses.

Are Ezra low-dose CT (LDCT) scans safe?

Everything in medicine has benefits and risks. An Ezra LDCT is safe, but it does expose you to ionizing radiation. The amount of exposure is less than a full dose chest CT and is FDA-regulated and approved. LDCT benefits include screening for lung cancer. If you’d like, you can discuss this more with your Ezra Medical Provider.

How much radiation will I be exposed to with a low-dose CT (LDCT)?

Low-dose CT scanners use ionizing radiation and are FDA-regulated equipment. The exact amount of radiation exposure depends on the radiation that is used and the radiation that is absorbed. This means an individual’s exposure depends on the specific protocol (e.g. looking at the lungs versus the lungs and the veins of the heart together) and an individual’s body composition and size (e.g. long torso versus short torso). A rough estimate of radiation exposure can be obtained here: https://www.xrayrisk.com/

Why should I get a low-dose CT (LDCT) of the chest?

Ezra uses LDCT for 1) screening for lung cancer and/or 2) obtaining a coronary calcium score (radiological evidence of calcium build-up in the heart’s blood vessels to determine risk for coronary artery disease). Like an Ezra Full Body (MRI), an Ezra LDCT is for asymptomatic individuals on a purely proactive basis. Please be advised, the coronary calcium score is not available at all radiology facilities at this time. 

How often should I get a low-dose CT (LDCT) to screen for lung cancer?

Due to radiation exposure with a LDCT, it is not recommended to have this screening done on a yearly basis for those considered low risk for lung cancer. The US Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommends annual screening for lung cancer with a LDCT for those individuals at high risk of lung cancer based on age, total cumulative exposure to tobacco smoke, and years since quitting smoking. If you’d like, you can discuss this more with your Ezra Medical Provider.

Who shouldn’t get a low-dose CT (LDCT) for lung cancer screening?

Ezra wants to ensure your health and safety. If you have any active or past history of significant pulmonary symptoms and/or conditions (e.g. current and/or chronic cough, lung cancer, history of radiation treatment to the chest, etc.), you will be best served by seeking evaluation and/or continuing care from your primary care provider or respective specialist.

What can I expect during the low-dose CT (LDCT) scan of the chest?

During the LDCT scan of the chest, you lie on your back on a movable table, which slides into the tube-like CT scanner. Your head is outside the scanner the whole time. The exam room will likely be cool.

You’ll be asked to lie still and hold your breath for a few seconds while the pictures are taken. The technician operates the scanner from a room next door, but can see and talk to you the entire time. The entire procedure should take about 10 to 15 minutes.

Coronary Artery Calcium Scoring
What is a Cardiac Calcium Score?

A cardiac calcium score is detected using a low-dose chest CT (LDCT). It allows for determination of radiological evidence of calcium build-up in the heart’s blood vessels. The calcium score is scored from 0 to 400+. The extent of coronary artery disease (CAD) is graded according to your calcium score. Plaque or calcium build-up in the coronary arteries can lead to heart disease or can lead to a heart attack or stroke. The purpose of this test is to understand your risk and then take preventive or corrective measures based on the results. Please be advised, the coronary calcium score is not available at all radiology facilities at this time.

Who should get a Cardiac Calcium Score?

Those who are at high risk for atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD) should get a cardiac calcium score. Such individuals may have elevated cholesterol, high blood pressure, diabetes, a history of smoking cigarettes, a high 10-year ASCVD risk score and/or a family history of premature ASCVD. If risk status is uncertain, cardiac calcium scoring can help clarify risk. If you’d like, you can discuss this more with your Ezra Medical Provider. Please be advised, the coronary calcium score is not available at all radiology facilities at this time.

Who shouldn’t get a low-dose CT (LDCT) for Coronary Calcium Scoring?

Ezra wants to ensure your health and safety. If you have any active or past history of significant cardiac symptoms and/or conditions (e.g. chest pain, coronary stents, known cardiac calcium score greater than 10), you will be best served by seeking evaluation and/or continuing care from your primary care provider or respective specialist. If you’d like, you can discuss this more with your Ezra Medical Provider.

How often should I get a Cardiac Calcium Score?

There are no current medical guidelines for determining how often to get a cardiac calcium score or how often it should be repeated. However, there is no indication to get or repeat coronary calcium scoring in those individuals who already have established coronary artery disease (CAD) or a coronary calcium score greater than 10. If you’d like, you can discuss this more with your Ezra Medical Provider.